Sed solely on BMI or body weight [14]. The limitations of these

Sed solely on BMI or body weight [14]. The limitations of these methods of nutritional assessment have been outlined in our recent review. Although BMI is a 79831-76-8 widely accepted screening tool for obesity, its specificity and sensitivity in undernutrition are unknown [15]. In cases of severe malnutrition, body weight alone, like many other useful screening tools, is not sufficiently sensitive to determine nutritional status [9,10]. Moreover, in children and adolescents, BMI should be used with caution, as it is relative to age; for instance a BMI of 17.5 would be on the 3rd percentile for a 19-year-old but on the 50th percentile for an 11-year old [16]. To our knowledge, no previous studies have investigated malnutrition using other indicators than BMI or weight, such as body composition components (fat mass and fat-free mass) and biological markers (albumin and prealbumin) and their relationship with the psychological status of AN patients, also considering factors related to depression and anxiety. Several debatable questions arise following the above buy Hexokinase II Inhibitor II, 3-BP introduction: 1) Would body composition components such as fat mass and fat free mass or biological markers tell us more about the relationship between the nutritional status of AN patients and depression and anxiety symptoms? 2) Are psychological symptoms directly related to nutritional status markers? Therefore, we hypothesis that 1) Depression and anxiety symptoms present in AN patient at admission to inpatient treatment are related to the severity of malnutrition, to the intensity of weight loss before admission and to the duration of illness. 2) Body composition and biological markers describe better the nutritional status compared to BMI and might be linked to the psychological symptoms. Thus the aim of the present study is to investigate, among severe AN subjects admitted to inpatient treatment units, the link between nutritional status evaluated by 3 different parameters (BMI, body composition and biological markers) and the severity of depressive, anxiety, OCD and social phobia symptoms, adjusting for confounding factors such as duration of illness, AN subtype and medication.up to 17 years of age, and BMI,17.5 for 17 years of age and above [18]. At inclusion, four patients did not have a BMI,17.5. However 2 of them went from a BMI above the 97th 23727046 percentile, to a BMI on the 10th percentile relative to their age in the year preceding hospitalization. The remaining 2 had a BMI,17.5 in the previous three months but were initially admitted to medicine wards, and had gained weight just before their transfer to the psychiatry unit and inclusion in the study. Three patients did not meet DSM_IV AN criterion D (amenorrhea, i.e. the absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles), but they reported irregularity in the cycles. In fact, amenorrhea is no longer a required criterion for AN diagnosis (DSM V) [19]. The overall assessment investigated different aspects concerning patient psychiatric/psychological and somatic status at admission to inpatient treatment. All the assessments were performed in the hospitals in the first 2 weeks after hospitalization.Assessments1 Psychological evaluation. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), a self-rating scale of 21 items assesses cognitive and motivational symptoms of depression at the time of evaluation [20,21]. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADs) is a selfreport scale rating 14 items, which assesses the most frequent anxiety and dep.Sed solely on BMI or body weight [14]. The limitations of these methods of nutritional assessment have been outlined in our recent review. Although BMI is a widely accepted screening tool for obesity, its specificity and sensitivity in undernutrition are unknown [15]. In cases of severe malnutrition, body weight alone, like many other useful screening tools, is not sufficiently sensitive to determine nutritional status [9,10]. Moreover, in children and adolescents, BMI should be used with caution, as it is relative to age; for instance a BMI of 17.5 would be on the 3rd percentile for a 19-year-old but on the 50th percentile for an 11-year old [16]. To our knowledge, no previous studies have investigated malnutrition using other indicators than BMI or weight, such as body composition components (fat mass and fat-free mass) and biological markers (albumin and prealbumin) and their relationship with the psychological status of AN patients, also considering factors related to depression and anxiety. Several debatable questions arise following the above introduction: 1) Would body composition components such as fat mass and fat free mass or biological markers tell us more about the relationship between the nutritional status of AN patients and depression and anxiety symptoms? 2) Are psychological symptoms directly related to nutritional status markers? Therefore, we hypothesis that 1) Depression and anxiety symptoms present in AN patient at admission to inpatient treatment are related to the severity of malnutrition, to the intensity of weight loss before admission and to the duration of illness. 2) Body composition and biological markers describe better the nutritional status compared to BMI and might be linked to the psychological symptoms. Thus the aim of the present study is to investigate, among severe AN subjects admitted to inpatient treatment units, the link between nutritional status evaluated by 3 different parameters (BMI, body composition and biological markers) and the severity of depressive, anxiety, OCD and social phobia symptoms, adjusting for confounding factors such as duration of illness, AN subtype and medication.up to 17 years of age, and BMI,17.5 for 17 years of age and above [18]. At inclusion, four patients did not have a BMI,17.5. However 2 of them went from a BMI above the 97th 23727046 percentile, to a BMI on the 10th percentile relative to their age in the year preceding hospitalization. The remaining 2 had a BMI,17.5 in the previous three months but were initially admitted to medicine wards, and had gained weight just before their transfer to the psychiatry unit and inclusion in the study. Three patients did not meet DSM_IV AN criterion D (amenorrhea, i.e. the absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles), but they reported irregularity in the cycles. In fact, amenorrhea is no longer a required criterion for AN diagnosis (DSM V) [19]. The overall assessment investigated different aspects concerning patient psychiatric/psychological and somatic status at admission to inpatient treatment. All the assessments were performed in the hospitals in the first 2 weeks after hospitalization.Assessments1 Psychological evaluation. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), a self-rating scale of 21 items assesses cognitive and motivational symptoms of depression at the time of evaluation [20,21]. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADs) is a selfreport scale rating 14 items, which assesses the most frequent anxiety and dep.

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